What Does Your Client Want?

Charitable Interests.

Your client may have a single charitable interest—an important cause or organization. Or your client may have several, or a desire to explore new community needs and opportunities as they arise. Note the charitable interests that your client would like to pursue.

  • Hometown community
  • Retirement community
  • Alma mater
  • Faith organization
  • Environment
  • Arts
  • Education
  • Health and human services
  • Youth
  • Other

Impact.

What kind of impact does your client hope to make with their charitable gift?

  • Solve specific, current, critical needs
  • Help the largest number of people possible
  • Make a significant difference in the lives of a few
  • Construct buildings that will endure for generations
  • Support operations of nonprofit organizations
  • Address long-term, systemic social issues
  • Other

Knowledge.

Would your client like more information in any of the following areas?

  • Establishing a philanthropic plan
  • Understanding community needs and opportunities
  • Evaluating charitable giving options
  • Starting or operating a private foundation
  • Starting a donor advised fund or supporting organization
  • Evaluating nonprofit effectiveness
  • Measuring impact of charitable gifts

Perpetuity.

Should your client's gift last forever? Your client can endow their gift so that only the income is spent and the principal becomes a growing source of community capital. Or, they can choose to spend all of their charitable assets. What is your client's preferred timetable?

  • Give all direct gifts with no endowment
  • Give some direct gifts with no endowment; endow some gifts
  • Give only endowed gifts

Recognition.

People like varying levels of recognition for their good work. It attracts attention to their cause, generates awareness and may inspire others to give. Some people prefer anonymity. What level of recognition does your client prefer?

  • Lasting recognition (name on a fund, foundation, building or permanent structure)
  • Public recognition (name in public announcement or media coverage)
  • Simple recognition (personal thank you and name listed in annual report or newsletter)
  • Anonymity

Control.

Is ultimate control over assets they give to charity important to your client? Some people aren’t comfortable without it. Others are glad to let go, once they’ve made some guiding decisions. Determining the range that’s comfortable for your client will help you, as their advisor, to recommend appropriate giving vehicles.

Less Control to More Control

Involvement.

Does your client want to play an active role in their giving, selecting recipients of their gift for years to come? Would they like to involve their children? Or would your client prefer to make one-time gifts with no future demands on their time?

  • No personal involvement
  • Current personal involvement
  • Lifetime personal involvement
  • Future personal involvement through children

Personalized Service.

Many charitable individuals choose to receive personalized services—assessment of community needs, administration of their philanthropy, investment management—that allow them to focus on the more rewarding aspects of giving. What are the services your client would find helpful?

  • Local community needs assessment
  • Due diligence of selected organizations
  • Planned giving assistance
  • Grant administration
  • Investment management
  • Facilitation of family meetings and charitable activities
  • Tax reporting

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Address

70 Audubon Street
New Haven, CT 06510
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Contact

(203) 777-2386
ContactUs@cfgnh.org

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